2021 CUSS Awards

1. CUSS Publicly Engaged Scholar Award 2021

Co-winners:

George Greenidge, Georgia State University

Stefanie A. DeLuca, Johns Hopkins University

2. CUSS Graduate Student Paper Award 2021

Ángel Mendiola Ross, University of California, Berkeley, “Outercity Policing: Drivers of Police Spending in a Changing Metropolis.”

3. CUSS Book Award 2021

Marco Garrido, University of Chicago, The Patchwork City: Class, Space, and Politics in Metro Manila (University of Chicago Press 2019)

4. CUSS Jane Addams Article Award 2021

Co-winners:

Bell, Monica C., Yale University, “Located Institutions: Neighborhood Frames, Residential Preferences, and the Case of Policing.” American Journal of Sociology 125, no. 4 (2020): 917-973.

Pacewicz, Josh (Brown University) and Robinson, John (Washington University, St. Louis), “Pocketbook Policing: How Race Shapes Municipal Reliance on Punitive Fines and Fees in the Chicago Suburbs. Socio-Economic Review (2020).

5. CUSS Robert and Helen Lynd Award for Lifetime Achievement 2021

Elijah Anderson, Yale University

Special Issue on Homelessness

The Dynamics of Homelessness: Research and Policy

Edited by Barrett A. Lee, Marybeth Shinn, and Dennis P. Culhane

The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (693; January 2021)

Contrary to popular perceptions of homelessness as static and enduring, this volume of The ANNALS provides a more nuanced view. Its 16 core articles employ innovative research designs and multiple types of over-time data to 1) analyze changes in homeless populations and the people experiencing homelessness; 2) examine factors leading to episodes of homelessness; and 3) evaluate interventions intended to end homelessness and to help individuals and families thrive. Contributors to the volume illuminate the dynamic nature of the phenomenon, both at the micro level (where people enter, pass through, and exit homelessness on different trajectories) and at the macro level (where shifting structural forces and public policies influence the scale of the problem and whom it affects).

Editors Barry Lee, Beth Shinn, and Dennis Culhane have assembled a set of contemporary studies that are informed by diverse disciplinary perspectives and methodological approaches. Taken together, these studies advance social scientific understanding of homelessness while suggesting how the problem might be more effectively addressed. Thus, they should be of interest to policy makers and practitioners as well as scholars.

For additional details about the volume, please see the attached PDF. The volume’s contents can also be downloaded for free by clicking on its title above. This period of open access runs from May 15 through June 30, 2021.

Understanding Housing Informality in Los Angeles

by Steven Schmidt, University of California Irvine
CUSS Newsletter, 2021 Summer, Vol 34, No 2

During a warm summer evening in Los Angeles, I interviewed Mabel on the sideline of her son’s baseball practice. A single mom from Guatemala, Mabel lives with her three kids in an apartment bedroom that she rents under the table from an older woman. Mabel sees the rented room as a stepping stone to owning a home: “I want to grow, to eventually have my own house. But for now with my situation, I have to wait a little longer to be able to do it.”[i] Later that year, I met Lisa, a middle-income white woman who rents a home about five minutes away from Mabel. Although her lease does not allow sublets, Lisa usually rents out one of her three bedrooms. I asked what she looks for in a roommate: “We don’t cook animal products, we eat organic, so a health-conscious person. We didn’t want more kids, that was just too much.” Sharing a home is relatively common in Los Angeles, where an estimated 47% of families live doubled-up, or with another adult who is not a romantic partner (Bretz, 2017). While many doubled-up renters live in multigenerational homes, Mabel and Lisa live with non-family members. How do renters find opportunities to rent spaces in other households, and how do families decide who they will allow to live with them?

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A Conversation w/ new City & Community book review editors Sofya Aptekar & Ervin Kosta

CUSS Newsletter, 2021 Summer, Vol 34, No 2

Albert Fu: Sofya and Ervin, first of all, congratulations on your new role as book review editors for City & Community. Can you tell us a little bit more about the new initiative on non-English book reviews?

Sofya Aptekar: Thank you, Albert. We’re pretty excited to be part of the effort of running this journal. The idea of adding reviews of books published in languages other than English was broached to us by the new editor-in-chief Richard E. Ocejo. Both Ervin and I thought it would be great for C&C readership, and have begun the exciting work of tracking down books published across the world.

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New Books (Summer 2021)

Castañeda, Ernesto. 2021. Building Walls: Excluding Latin People in the United States. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781498585651/Building-Walls-Excluding-Latin-People-in-the-United-States

Gonzales, Teresa Irene. 2021. Building a Better Chicago: Race and Community Resistance to Urban Redevelopment. New York: New York University Press. https://nyupress.org/9781479813568/building-a-better-chicago/

Hondagneu-Sotelo, Pierrette and Manuel Pastor.  2021.  South Central Dreams: Finding Home and Building Community in South L.A. New York: New York University Press. https://nyupress.org/9781479807970/south-central-dreams/

Korver-Glenn, Elizabeth. 2021. Race Brokers: Housing Markets and Segregation in 21st Century Urban America. New York: Oxford University Press. https://global.oup.com/academic/product/race-brokers-9780190063863

Montgomery, Alesia (2020). Greening the Black Urban Regime: The Culture and Commerce of Sustainability in Detroit. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press. https://www.wsupress.wayne.edu/books/detail/greening-black-urban-regime

Stuber, Jenny. 2021. Aspen and the American Dream: How One Town Manages Inequality in the Era of Supergentrification. University of California Press. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520306608/aspen-and-the-american-dream

Taplin-Kaguru, Nora E. 2021. Grasping for the American Dream: Racial Segregation, Social Mobility, and Homeownership. New York, NY: Routledge.https://www.routledge.com/Grasping-for-the-American-Dream-Racial-Segregation-Social-Mobility-and/Taplin-Kaguru/p/book/9780367075941

Xu, Fang. 2021. Silencing Shanghai: Language and Identity in Urban China. Lanham: Lexington Books.            https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781793635310/Silencing-Shanghai-Language-and-Identity-in-Urban-China

Call for Papers: The State and the Covid Crisis

Special Issue in the Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society
Editors: Mia Gray, Michael Kitson, Linda Lobao, and Ron Martin

This Special Issue aims to address the big debates about whether and how the pandemic has changed the role of the state at the level of localities and regions. While the state’s role in some nations has clearly shifted dramatically, these changes remain influenced by earlier actions (the reduction in public sector spending, the weakening of regulatory authority, and the overall diversion of resources to the private sector) associated with the promotion of neoliberalism and austerity. To what degree has the response to the pandemic re-shaped the structure, remit, and processes of the state? In exploring the changed role of the post-Covid state, articles might address such questions as the following:

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Interview w/ Jackelyn Hwang: 2020 Addams Award for Best Article

Jackelyn Hwang, an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Stanford University, was the winner of the 2020 Jane Addams Award for best article. Jackelyn’s innovative research agenda examines the relationship between how neighborhoods change and the persistence of neighborhood inequality by race and class in US cities. We reached out to ask her to discuss her research, and we’re including her responses below. Thanks to Jackelyn for participating in our interview series!

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2020 Park Award: Sites Unseen

The winner of the 2020 Robert E. Park Award is Sites Unseen: Uncovering Hidden Hazards in American Cities.  New York: Russell Sage Foundation by Scott Frickel  & James R. Elliott. It is part of the American Sociological Association’s Rose Series in Sociology. Below is a discussion with the winners on industrial waste and its legacy in the urban landscape.

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