Urban Sociology Resources on ASA TRAILS

ASA TRAILS

Prepping your fall courses? Did you know ASA TRAILS has a number of urban sociology resources that can help you get ready? Here are a few examples:

Don’t forget that you can also submit teaching resources to TRAILS.

CUSS 2019 Pre-Conference: Inequalities and Social Justice in the 21st Century

The ASA Community and Urban Sociology Section is pleased to announce a one-day conference on Inequalities and Social Justice in the 21st Century City to be held on Friday, August 9, 2019 at New York University’s Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service. Below is the exciting program for the conference.

At present we are not charging a registration fee now but may begin to charge for registrations after the first 120 participants or after July 26.

We also encourage all participants to become CUSS members.

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2019 CUSS Awards

Robert and Helen Lynd Award for Distinguished Career Achievement

Anne B. Shlay, Georgia State University

Robert E. Park Book Award co-winners

Marcus Anthony Hunter and Zandria F. Robinson. 2018. Chocolate Cities: The Black Map of American Life. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

and

Esther Sullivan. 2018. Manufactured Insecurity: Mobile Home Parks and Americans’ Tenuous Right to Place. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

Jane Addams Article Award

Papachristos, Andrew and Sara Bastomski. 2018. “Connected in Crime: The Enduring Effect of Neighborhood Networks on the Spatial Patterning of Violence.” American Journal of Sociology 124:517-568.

CUSS Graduate Student Paper Award

Winner: Zachary Hyde, University of British Columbia. 2018. “Giving Back to Get Ahead: Altruism as a Developer Strategy of Accumulation Through Affordable Housing Policy in Toronto and Vancouver,” Geoforum (online ahead of print)

Honorable mention: Christine Jang-Trettien, Johns Hopkins University, “Social Structure of the Informal Housing Market”

The awards will be presented at the CUSS Business Meeting and Award Ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 10 @ 3:30-4:10pm in the Empire Ballroom East on the Second Floor of the Sheraton New York (though double check final program to verify location). Please join us to celebrate!

NEW COVER: City & Community

Kyle Galindez
University of California, Santa Cruz

Steven Schmidt
University of California, Irvine

Interview with Deirdre Oakley, Editor-in-Chief, City & Community

CUSS Newsletter, 2019 Spring, Vol. 32, No 2

-City & Community recently debuted a new cover for the March 2019 volume. What motivated the redesign?

When I became editor in 2018, the original cover design was 16 years old and I thought it was time for a new look. I also found out that Wiley, our publisher, would work with me and my on-site editorial staff on a new design free-of-charge. At the time, the Section’s Chair (Miriam Greenberg) and Publication Committee’s co-chairs (Heather MacIndoe and Japonica Brown-Saracino were supportive of the idea), as was ASA.

-Can you tell me about your editorial vision for the new cover?

There is a form of cityscape art called original line/pencil illustration or rendering. I was familiar with British Illustrator Abi Daker’s work (http://www.abigaildaker.com) and found it inspiring. This is because, symbolically, the contributions to City & Community ‘draw’ cities and the communities within them (both past and present) to reveal unique visions of previously uncovered productions.

One of the urban themes I learned when I was pursuing my master’s degree in geography in the early 1990s was that of the city as a palimpsest. This historic word originally referred to the reuse of parchment for the written word during the 1500s. Basically, with parchment, the previous text — while erased – bled through the new text. We could liken this practice today to what happens with graffiti. But back to history, the term palimpsest began to be used more broadly in the realm of urbanism to illustrate the multiple layers of the city, whether it’s about changes over time, the way different groups perceive their city, placemaking and de-placemaking, infrastructure, inequality (ethnic, racial or socioeconomic), as well as how such aspects of the urban environs are imagined. While it’s virtually impossible to convey the city palimpsest surface in a static cover design, that’s the foundational idea behind our new cover: a rendering of some generic city in line/pencil illustration form, which fades into the distance representing the present, past and future. Fortunately, we had the option for two colors to distinguish the journal title from the artwork.

The Wiley design team is confined to working with stock art (no this is not Daker’s work!), so it took some back and forth to get the image in line with what I wanted it to convey. They did a great job, for which we are all very appreciative. I am also grateful for the quick turn-around time for cover redesign approval by our Section leadership as well as the ASA.

On behalf of the entire on-site GSU Editorial Team, I’ll just say we hope you all like our new cover!

Mentorship Sessions at ASA 2019

2019 Annual Meeting

This is the last call for participants for the mentoring sessions for the ASA annual meeting in NYC! 

Thanks to all who have already signed up. Our team will begin matching folks soon, but we want to give one last chance to anyone else. Perhaps your schedule shifted and you’ll be attending? Perhaps you know a grad student whose paper was accepted and can now participate?

Fill out the form (CLICK HERE) by Friday, May 31st, and we’ll find a place for you.

Jon Wynn and Albert Fu

Chair’s Message (Spring 2019)

Rachel Dwyer
Ohio State State University
2019 Spring, Vol. 32, No 2

This spring has brought me occasions to reflect on mentoring and public engagement as a bedrock of our activities as scholars and, when done well, a source of great meaning, connection, and fulfillment. One of those occasions has been the energy around mentoring in the Section. I’m proud to be part of the Community and Urban Sociology tradition of strong mentoring. We have several initiatives this spring that reflect and build on this tradition. Recently, a call went out to continue our highly successful mentoring meetings, initiated two years ago. We encourage senior volunteers to mentor junior scholars at the upcoming ASA meeting in New York, and we encourage all junior scholars interested in making mentoring connections to sign up to be matched with a more senior scholar. We are planning mentoring activities at the preconference, with more information to come this summer.

We are also proposing an amendment to our bylaws to create a formal “Mentoring Committee,” in order to further support and develop the work of the section. This proposal was developed under Chair Miriam Greenberg’s term, and as a result of research done by the Membership committee and an ad hoc Mentorship committee. The proposal to put the bylaws on the ballot was approved by the 2017-2018 Section Council and at the 2018 section business meeting at the ASA. I encourage all members to vote yes to the bylaw amendment to create a Mentoring Committee to continue to build on the energy and commitment to mentoring in our section. This initiative supports our current members, draws in new members as a major recognized benefit of this section, and builds community by connecting members to each other.

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