City & Community News – Moving to SAGE

  1. City & Community is in the final stages for its transition from Wiley to Sage. To submit a manuscript (including revisions) paste https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cico DIRECTLY into your proser. If you go to the Wiley submission page, you won’t find a portal for City & Community. Manuscript are now going out for review. Those that were in the queue from the pause on reviewing have all been sent out. We are in the process of creating a CUNY email address for C&C, which should go live in the next several months. If you have questions you can email us directly (doakley1@gsu.edu or rocejo@jjay.cuny.edu) or use the GSU email (cico@gsu.edu).
  2. Our September 2020 issue is live! https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/15406040/2020/19/3
    • The issue’s symposium: “Eyes of a Storm: COVID-19, Systemic Racism, and Police Brutality” is free access for the next month and features essays by Phil Kasinitz, Alyasah Ali Sewell, Katie Acosta, Jean Beaman, Bruce Haynes, Tyler Gay, Sam Hammer and Erin Ruel. We also have a feature article; “ ‘Not Just a Lateral Move’: Residential Decisions and the Reproduction of Urban Inequality by Stefanie DeLuca and Christine Jang-Trettien.
  3. The December 2020 issue will be the last issue published with Wiley and we are excited about the journal moving to Sage.

Cornell Position

Dear CUSS Members,

The Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University is inviting applications for an Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor working on race and public policy who would join the department in July of 2021. We would appreciate your help sharing this announcement with your students, colleagues, research networks, and social media sites.

Link to application: https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/16864

Assistant, Associate or Full Professor – Policy Analysis and Management, Cornell University

The Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University invites applications for an Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor working on race and public policy. This is conceived broadly to include research on racial inequality, for example, in income, education, social mobility, health, housing, policing, and incarceration. The position is 50% research and 50% teaching and advising. The successful candidate will be part of Cornell’s new School of Public Policy and will have the opportunity to be jointly appointed in a disciplinary home in the social sciences. We are seeking applications from candidates in sociology, economics, public policy, and related fields. 

We will begin reviewing applications on October 1, and applications will be accepted until the position is filled.  Click here to apply – applications must include: (a) Cover Letter; (b) Curriculum Vitae; (c) Research Statement; (d) Teaching Statement; (e) up to three examples of written work(s); (f) Statement of contribution to diversity; (g) Three References (just names and email addresses; final candidates will be asked to submit letters later).

Qualifications:  Ph.D. in Sociology, Economics, Public Policy, or related field.

Contact search committee chair, Prof. Maureen Waller (mailto:waller@cornell.edu), with any questions.

Diversity and Inclusion are a part of Cornell University’s heritage. We are a recognized employer and educator valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities.

Dartmouth College Position

The Department of sociology invites applications for a full-time tenure-track appointment at the assistant professor level beginning fall 2021. We seek scholars who have teaching and research expertise in race and ethnicity. Applicants should have a Ph.D. or equivalent in Sociology or a related field before the appointment begins. The successful qualified candidate will be appointed initially as a Faculty Fellow, a two-year residential postdoctoral appointment. After this two-year period, the position will convert to a regular tenure-track appointment as Assistant Professor. Faculty Fellows are part of a cohort of faculty committed to increasing diversity in their disciplines.  Dartmouth is highly committed to fostering a diverse and inclusive population of students, faculty, and staff. We are especially interested in applicants who are able to work effectively with students, faculty, and staff from all backgrounds, including but not limited to: racial and ethnic minorities, women, individuals who identify with LGBTQ+ communities, individuals with disabilities, individuals from lower income backgrounds, and/or first generation college graduates. Applicants should state in their cover letter how their teaching, research, service, and/or life experiences prepare them to advance Dartmouth’s commitments to diversity, equity, and inclusion. We will begin reviewing applications on September 1, 2020. Apply via interfolio: https://apply.interfolio.com/77976

New Books By Section Members

Digital Nomads: In Search of Freedom, Community, and Meaningful Work in the New Economy by Rachael A. Woldoff and Robert C. Litchfield

A small but growing group of today’s knowledge workers actively seek a lifestyle of freedom, using technology to perform their jobs, traveling far and wide, and moving as often as they like. These digital nomads have left their local coffee shops behind and now proudly post their “office of the day” photos from exotic locales, but what do their lives really look like?

In Digital Nomads, Rachael Woldoff and Robert Litchfield take readers into an expatriate digital nomad community in Bali, Indonesia to better understand this growing demographic of typically Millennial workers. Through dozens of interviews and several stints living in a digital nomad hub, Woldoff and Litchfield present new answers to classic questions about community, creativity, and work. They further show why digital nomads leave their conventional lives behind, arguing that creative class and Millennial workers, though successful, often feel that their “world class cities” and desirable jobs are anything but paradise. They first follow their transitions into freelancing, entrepreneurship, and remote work, then explain how digital nomads create a fluid but intimate community abroad in the company of like-minded others. Ultimately, Woldoff and Litchfield provide insight into digital nomads’ efforts to live and work in ways that balance freedom, community, and creative fulfillment in the digital age.

A sympathetic yet critical take on this emerging group of workers, Digital Nomads provides a revealing take on the changing nature of work and the problems of the new economy.

Chasing World-Class Urbanism: Global Policy versus Everyday Survival in Buenos Aires by Jacob Lederman

What makes some cities world class? Increasingly, that designation reflects the use of a toolkit of urban planning practices and policies that circulates around the globe. These strategies—establishing creative districts dedicated to technology and design, “greening” the streets, reinventing historic districts as tourist draws—were deployed to build a globally competitive Buenos Aires after its devastating 2001 economic crisis. In this richly drawn account, Jacob Lederman explores what those efforts teach us about fast-evolving changes in city planning practices and why so many local officials chase a nearly identical vision of world-class urbanism.

Lederman explores the influence of Northern nongovernmental organizations and multilateral agencies on a prominent city of the global South. Using empirical data, keen observations, and interviews with people ranging from urban planners to street vendors he explores how transnational best practices actually affect the lives of city dwellers. His research also documents the forms of resistance enacted by everyday residents and the tendency of local institutions and social relations to undermine the top-down plans of officials. Most important, Lederman highlights the paradoxes of world-class urbanism: for instance, while the priorities identified by international agencies are expressed through nonmarket values such as sustainability, inclusion, and livability, local officials often use market-centric solutions to pursue them. Further, despite the progressive rhetoric used to describe urban planning goals, in most cases their result has been greater social, economic, and geographic stratification.

Chasing World-Class Urbanism is a much-needed guide to the intersections of culture, ideology, and the realities of twenty-first-century life in a major Latin American city, one that illuminates the tension between technocratic aspirations and lived experience.

New City & Community Editor

Dear CUSS Membership,

I’m writing to deliver an important announcement.

I’m pleased to announce that our section’s journal, City & Community (C&C), has a new editor-in-chief: Richard E. Ocejo. Richard’s vision is to build upon the journal’s strong foundation and broaden its influence within the discipline of sociology and the field of urban studies. In the coming years, C&C readers and authors can expect a lot of continuity from Deirdre Oakley’s outstanding editorship (e.g., an increasingly international focus, quick turnaround on reviews, and publication timeline) as well as some new initiatives. Among Richard’s plans are a revamped, active, and inclusive editorial board, additional website content (like podcast interviews), and a professional development program for young scholars. I’m very excited to see how he advances our journal over the next few years.

I want to thank Richard for taking on this critical CUSS role as well as acknowledge Kirsta Paulsen (chair, CUSS Publications Committee), Japonica Brown-Saracino (past CUSS chair), and the Publications Committee and Council members for their great work in helping to select our new C&C editor. I also want to sincerely thank Deirdre Oakley for her incredible effort as C&C’s editor for the last three years.

As the fall semester gets underway, I hope you manage to remain productive and energized during these difficult times. Our collective work on urban dynamics, race, and social justice is so important right now and I urge you to stay engaged with the academy, CUSS, and your community.

Best,

Derek Hyra

Section Chair

CUSS Digest (August 2020)

CUSS Digest Banner

Dear all,

Please find our August digest below.  Contents include:

  1. Community and Urban Sociology Section Newsletter
  2. Virtual Engagement Event
  3. Faculty Position
  4. New Book Announcement

This is my final digest as the chair of the section. It has been a pleasure and honor to serve the section in this role. I look forward to the great work that incoming chair Derek Hyra and the other section officers, council, and committee members will accomplish in the year ahead.

All the best,

Japonica

Japonica Brown-Saracino
Professor of Sociology & WGS

Boston University
Chair, ASA Community and Urban Sociology Section

Read more

Message from Communications Team

2020 represented a significant change from how CUSS has managed communications to its members. This process began under our past chairs Miriam Greenberg and Rachel Dwyer. We have now shifted our focus away from a traditional PDF newsletter to a combination of email, our website (comurb.org), Facebook, and Twitter (@ComUrbASA). For instance, current chair Japonica Brown-Saracino has been sending out a monthly digest of section updates and announcements via the listserve. This digest is also posted on our Comurb.org and tweeted out by members of our team. While we are relying more on social media to get information out, we will be collecting items from the past year and posting a PDF. That way we can continue to have an archive of traditional newsletters, even as technology continues to evolve. It also continues the great work of Bill Holt, our newsletter letter editor since 2001.

As we move forward, we welcome suggestions as to how we can better serve CUSS members. This includes using the website to highlight the great work – advocacy, scholarship, and teaching – that is done by you all. We would love to post short essays or editorial-style pieces on Comurb.org. If you are interested, pitch us your ideas.

  • Albert Fu <afu@kutztown.edu>
  • Kyle Galindez <kgalinde@ucsc.edu>
  • Lora Phillips <laphillips216@gmail.com>
  • Steven Schmidt <stvnschmidt@gmail.com>

Chair’s Message

Japonica Brown-Saracino
Boston University
Summer 2020, Vol. 33, No. 2

Under ordinary circumstances, many of us would be preparing for travel to San Francisco.  We would be looking forward to gathering together, in person, at our sessions, business meeting, roundtables, and for a reception at the Tenderloin Museum.    I am certain that I am not alone in regretting the missed opportunity to engage with one another at our sessions, as well as to talk more informally in a variety of conference settings – from the book exhibit, to the crowded hallways where we would ordinarily gather between panels.

Read more

CUSS Digest (June 2020)

CUSS Digest Banner

Dear all,

I am thinking of everyone and looking forward to coming together – virtually – in August with those who are able to participate in the remote ASA conference.  It is a crucial moment for urbanists to be in conversation with one another as our current context brings to light and exacerbates longstanding inequalities and injustice.  Racist state violence, police brutality, and protest suppression are pressing urban concerns that should be central to conversations within our subfield.  I will be in touch in coming weeks about plans for virtual section activities during the conference, and welcome emails (my address is below) from section members about how, as a section, we can elevate these concerns and conversations within and beyond our scholarship and meetings.

Below, you will find our June Digest.  Contents include:

A) Section Election Results

B) Section Award Winners

Best,

Japonica

Read more
« Older Entries