Tag Archives: lynd award

2019 CUSS Awards

Robert and Helen Lynd Award for Distinguished Career Achievement

Anne B. Shlay, Georgia State University

Robert E. Park Book Award co-winners

Marcus Anthony Hunter and Zandria F. Robinson. 2018. Chocolate Cities: The Black Map of American Life. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

and

Esther Sullivan. 2018. Manufactured Insecurity: Mobile Home Parks and Americans’ Tenuous Right to Place. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

Jane Addams Article Award

Papachristos, Andrew and Sara Bastomski. 2018. “Connected in Crime: The Enduring Effect of Neighborhood Networks on the Spatial Patterning of Violence.” American Journal of Sociology 124:517-568.

CUSS Graduate Student Paper Award

Winner: Zachary Hyde, University of British Columbia. 2018. “Giving Back to Get Ahead: Altruism as a Developer Strategy of Accumulation Through Affordable Housing Policy in Toronto and Vancouver,” Geoforum (online ahead of print)

Honorable mention: Christine Jang-Trettien, Johns Hopkins University, “Social Structure of the Informal Housing Market”

The awards will be presented at the CUSS Business Meeting and Award Ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 10 @ 3:30-4:10pm in the Empire Ballroom East on the Second Floor of the Sheraton New York (though double check final program to verify location). Please join us to celebrate!

2018 Lynd Award Recipient: Career Reflections

Nancy Denton
SUNY Albany
CUSS Newsletter, 2019 Winter, Vol 32, No 1

At the end of my first year of retirement from the University at Albany, I was thrilled to receive the Robert and Helen Lynd Lifetime Achievement Award from the Community and Urban Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association. As I examined the list of others who had won it, I was humbled and extremely grateful to my nominator and to the committee who chose me. Winning this award, along with retirement, has given me the perfect opportunity to reflect on my career as an urban sociologist. And as I’m sure others would agree, urban sociology is a particularly rewarding field as you are able to investigate “real” problems that affect “real” people. (Of course my demographic training led me to do this from a data perspective, not one of actual on-the-ground engagement in the urban landscape. But be that as it may.)

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2017 Lynd Award: Neighborhood & the City

Robert Sampson

Robert J Sampson
Harvard University
CUSS Newsletter, Spring 2017, Vol. 30, No 2.

Community and urban sociologists have long addressed questions of fundamental concern to the discipline. This centrality continues. Whether racial segregation, the suburbanization of poverty, durable neighborhood inequality, gentrification, the great crime decline, or the globalizaion of cities, the research of CUSS members probes questions relevant to the discipline at large and the general public. I am thus grateful to be honored with the Lynd Award for lifetime achievement and be part of a community of scholars committed to the rigorous study of communities, both past and present.

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2012 Lynd Award: Urban Theory as Context Specification

Terry Nichols Clark
University of Chicago
2012 Fall, Vol. 25, No. 1

I am honored to receive the Lynd Award. I propose to celebrate a truly community approach. My simple argument is that we in the West exaggerate individualism. We give prizes to individuals, seldom teams and themes. Yet, teams are critical in much of social science. Not just for data but for building complex theories which specify how interpretations shift by location. Team members from different locations add value. Most of my publications are coauthored, indicating these debts. When I have been congratulated, I reply, I could not have done it without you. To date no one has disagreed, including the janitor.

Community does not necessarily imply harmony, but can include stimulating disagreement and debate.

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2011 Lynd Award: Urban Sociology and the Health of the Nation’s Cities

Greg Squires
George Washington University
2011 Fall, Vol. 24, No. 1

The state of urban sociology is probably healthier than that of the nation’s urban and metropolitan areas. I do not think there is a connection. At least I hope this is not the case. But I am reminded of Robert Lynd’s warning from his 1939 book Knowledge for What that academics do not want to be caught “lecturing on navigation while the ship is going down.”

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