Author Archives: Community & Urban Sociology

New Books (Summer 2021)

Castañeda, Ernesto. 2021. Building Walls: Excluding Latin People in the United States. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781498585651/Building-Walls-Excluding-Latin-People-in-the-United-States

Gonzales, Teresa Irene. 2021. Building a Better Chicago: Race and Community Resistance to Urban Redevelopment. New York: New York University Press. https://nyupress.org/9781479813568/building-a-better-chicago/

Hondagneu-Sotelo, Pierrette and Manuel Pastor.  2021.  South Central Dreams: Finding Home and Building Community in South L.A. New York: New York University Press. https://nyupress.org/9781479807970/south-central-dreams/

Korver-Glenn, Elizabeth. 2021. Race Brokers: Housing Markets and Segregation in 21st Century Urban America. New York: Oxford University Press. https://global.oup.com/academic/product/race-brokers-9780190063863

Montgomery, Alesia (2020). Greening the Black Urban Regime: The Culture and Commerce of Sustainability in Detroit. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press. https://www.wsupress.wayne.edu/books/detail/greening-black-urban-regime

Stuber, Jenny. 2021. Aspen and the American Dream: How One Town Manages Inequality in the Era of Supergentrification. University of California Press. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520306608/aspen-and-the-american-dream

Taplin-Kaguru, Nora E. 2021. Grasping for the American Dream: Racial Segregation, Social Mobility, and Homeownership. New York, NY: Routledge.https://www.routledge.com/Grasping-for-the-American-Dream-Racial-Segregation-Social-Mobility-and/Taplin-Kaguru/p/book/9780367075941

Xu, Fang. 2021. Silencing Shanghai: Language and Identity in Urban China. Lanham: Lexington Books.            https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781793635310/Silencing-Shanghai-Language-and-Identity-in-Urban-China

Call for Papers: The State and the Covid Crisis

Special Issue in the Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society
Editors: Mia Gray, Michael Kitson, Linda Lobao, and Ron Martin

This Special Issue aims to address the big debates about whether and how the pandemic has changed the role of the state at the level of localities and regions. While the state’s role in some nations has clearly shifted dramatically, these changes remain influenced by earlier actions (the reduction in public sector spending, the weakening of regulatory authority, and the overall diversion of resources to the private sector) associated with the promotion of neoliberalism and austerity. To what degree has the response to the pandemic re-shaped the structure, remit, and processes of the state? In exploring the changed role of the post-Covid state, articles might address such questions as the following:

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Chair’s Message (Winter 2021)

Derek Hyra
American University
2021 Winter, Vol. 34, No.1 

Let me start by wishing everyone a happy, healthy, and productive New Year. 2020 was nothing short of a high speed train wreck. The pandemic and continued police brutality brought on immeasurable suffering and loss, exposing once again the dire consequences of systemic racial inequality. Communities of color have been disproportionally affected by this virus and police aggression. Now more than ever our sociologically-informed, community and urban research is greatly needed, and I implore you to position your work to help fuel social justice efforts aimed at ameliorating racial and spatial inequality.

On the social justice front, the CUSS Council has taken action. First, in November 2019, the Council unanimously approved important by-law amendments. This year you will asked to vote on changes that, if approved, would establish a new Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Committee. The DEI Committee, under the direction of an elected chair, will undertake activities to understand and reduce racial/ethnic disparities that exist within our section. The establishment of a DEI Committee would demonstrate our section’s steadfast commitment to fairness. I ask that you vote in favor of this timely and needed by-law change.

Second, while we regretfully cannot meet in person in Chicago this summer, our Council has proposed four themed sessions intended to highlight scholarship on important contemporary urban issues. We will have online sessions on the global uprisings and the Black Lives Matter movement; the pandemic and its impact on cities; emerging urban politics and policies; and critical perspectives on injustice embedded in our urban sociology traditions. My hope is that our 2021 ASA sessions will facilitate meaningful discourses both within and beyond the academy. Be sure to submit a paper for one of these sessions by February 3.

Third, our section’s journal, City & Community (C&C), has made strategic changes intended to advance diversity and inclusion. Richard E. Ocejo, C&C’s new editor, has refreshed the journal’s editorial leadership to include new people and perspectives. Moreover, the journal will implement an exciting professional development program for young scholars. This new program will serve as a systematic support structure, along with our section’s annual meeting mentoring initiative, to advance the next generation of talented urban sociologists.

No question, the pandemic has seriously challenged and tested us emotionally, financially, and physically; sadly, we have lost family members, friends, and colleagues. While we will not be together in Chicago this year to comfort one another (or to celebrate our successes), we should take solace in knowing we are part of a special group that produces knowledge to challenge and change our society for the better. Rest assured, in 2022 in Los Angeles, we will be together and we will lecture, laugh, and libate. Until then stay healthy, motivated, and safe! And do not forget to renew your CUSS membership and nominate your colleagues (or yourself) for one of our annual awards!

2020 Lynd Award: Lessons Learned: A Perspective from Golden Pond

Barrett Lee
Pennsylvania State University
2021 Winter, Vol. 34, No.1 

Being named the 2020 recipient of the Robert and Helen Lynd Award for Lifetime Achievement has been both gratifying and humbling, given the distinguished honorees who preceded me. I was taken by surprise when Kevin Gotham (the Lynd committee chair) first passed along the news last spring. That initial reaction quickly gave way to an appreciation of the award as a collective rather than solo accomplishment. From my undergraduate days to the present, I’ve had the good fortune to learn from and work with many talented and inspiring students, mentors, colleagues, and collaborators.

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What to Expect at City & Community

Richard E. Ocejo
John Jay College and the Graduate Center, CUNY
2021 Winter, Vol. 34, No.1 

It is an absolute honor to be the next Editor-in-Chief at City & Community. The journal began publication around when I started graduate school, so there hasn’t been a time when I haven’t known of its existence. Whether from reading its pages, contributing as an author, or assigning its pieces in my courses, it has played an indispensable role in my career. And now getting to run City & Community at this stage in its history, build on the efforts of so many great Editors and scholars, and take it to another level is a dream come true.

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ASA Teaching Award Nominations Sought

From Leonard Nevarez:

As a member of the ASA Distinguished Contributions to Teaching Award, I’m writing to encourage you to nominate a colleague or yourself for the 2021 award. Here’s the relevant info from the ASA Awards page:

The ASA Distinguished Contributions to Teaching Award honors ASA members’ outstanding contributions to the teaching of undergraduate and/or graduate sociology. The award recognizes contributions that have made a significant impact on the manner in which sociology is taught at a regional, state, national, or international level.

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City & Community’s Urban Scholars Development Program

City & Community’s Urban Scholars Development Program has been running smoothly and we have room for more participants. The program is aimed at providing one-on-one mentorship for early-career urban scholars (graduate students, post-docs, recent graduates) to aid them in their scholarship. In doing so we are developing the next generation of urban researchers and expanding the urban literature.

Potential mentees may email the journal directly (cicojournal@gmail.com) to be considered for the program or may be offered the opportunity to participate by the Editor-in-Chief or a Deputy Editor upon submission to the journal. Mentees will get assigned a faculty mentor from the editorial board to help them with their work. Mentors will help shape the mentees’ work into a publishable manuscript and work with them at least until the first successful submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

Scholars from underrepresented backgrounds are strongly encouraged to apply.

Eligibility criteria:
– Must have no prior sole-authored academic publications
– Must have an article-length manuscript

While the expectation is authors will submit their finished work to City & Community upon completing mentorship, they are not required to do so. (Note: going through the program is not a substitute for peer review.)

*Updated 5/26/2021

New Books

It’s a Setup: Fathering from the Social and Economic Margins

By Timothy Black and Sky Keyes

The expectation for fathers to be more involved with parenting their children and pitching in at home are higher than ever, yet broad social, political, and economic changes have made it more difficult for low-income men to be fathers. In It’s a Setup, Timothy Black and Sky Keyes ground a moving and intimate narrative in the political and economic circumstances that shape the lives of low-income fathers. Based on 138 life history interviews, they expose the contradiction that while the norms and expectations of father involvement have changed rapidly within a generation, labor force and state support for fathering on the margins has deteriorated. Tracking these life histories, they move us through the lived experiences of job precarity, welfare cuts, punitive child support courts, public housing neglect, and the criminalization of poverty to demonstrate that without transformative systemic change, individual determination is not enough. Fathers on the social and economic margins are setup to fail.

Airbnb, Short-Term Rentals and the Future of Housing

By Lily M. Hoffman, Barbara Schmitter Heisler

How do Airbnb and short-term rentals affect housing and communities? Locating the origins and success of Airbnb in the conditions wrought by the 2008 financial crisis, the authors bring together a diverse body of literature and construct case studies of cities in the US, Australia and Germany to examine the struggles of local authorities to protect their housing and neighborhoods from the increasing professionalization and commercialization of Airbnb.

The book argues that the most disruptive impact of Airbnb and short-term rentals has been on housing and neighborhoods in urban centers where housing markets are stressed. Despite its claims, Airbnb has revealed itself as platform capitalism, incentivizing speculation in residential housing. At the heart of this trajectory is its business model and control over access to data. In a first narrative, the authors discuss how Airbnb has institutionalized short-term rentals, consequently removing long-term rentals, contributing to rising rents and changing neighborhood milieus as visitors replace long-term residents. In a second narrative the authors trace the transformation of short-term rentals into a multibillion-dollar hybrid real estate sector promoting a variety of flexible tenure models. While these models provide more options for owners and investors, they have the potential to undermine housing security and exacerbate housing inequality.

While the overall effects have been similar across countries and cities, depending on housing systems, local response has varied from less restrictive in Australia to increasingly restrictive in the United States and most restrictive in Germany. Although Airbnb has made some concessions, it has not given any city the data needed to efficiently enforce regulations, making for costly externalities. Written in a clear and direct style, this volume will appeal to students and scholars in Urban Studies, Urban Planning, Housing and Tourism Studies.

CFP: Urban Processes Under Racial Capitalism

Urban Processes Under Racial Capitalism

Special Issue

City & Community

Guest Editors:

  • Prentiss A. Dantzler, Georgia State University
  • Junia Howell, University of Pittsburgh
  • Elizabeth Korver-Glenn, University of New Mexico

For over a century, urban sociologists have attempted to disentangle the role race and class play in shaping city spaces and urban lives. However, Black scholars have challenged this dichotomy, arguing race and class are mutually constituted forms of exploitation. In his pioneering book, Black Marxism, the late historian Cedric J. Robinson argues racism was fundamental to the feudal order of early capitalism and has remained foundational in all constructions of class. Seminal works like W.E.B. Du Bois’ (1935) Black Reconstruction and more recent books like Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor’s (2019) Race for Profit echo Robinson’s approach arguing economic value is derived from the racialization of labor and property. Yet, urban sociology has not fully explored how racial capitalism changes and reshapes our core theoretical approaches.

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CUSS 2021 Award Committees

CUSS Digest Banner

Below are our section’s 2021 award committee calls. Please note we have a new award this year, the Publicly-Engaged Scholar Award. I thank all of the award committee chairs and members for their willingness to serve as well as council member Jean Beaman for organizing these committees. You all are publishing great work and I am excited to see who gets recognized next year.

All submissions must be received by March 1, 2021 and award winners will be notified by June 30, 2021.

Best,

Derek Hyra

Section Chair

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