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News & Notes

CUSS Newsletter, 2019 Winter, Vol 32, No 1


Several CUSS members received the Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) 40 for 40 Fellowship. CUSS members receiving fellowships include: Prentiss A. Dantzler, Colorado College; Jacob Faber, New York University; Michael Gaddis, UCLA; Philip Garboden, University of Hawaii at Manoa; and Eva Rosen, Georgetown University. A full list of fellows is available at the website: http://www.appam.org/meet-the-recipients-of-the-40-for-40-fellowship/

●Jeni Cross, Sociology, and Deana Davalos, Psychology, Colorado State University, and their research team received the inaugural Emerging Community Engagement Scholarship Award from the Office of Engagement and the Office of the Provost. The Emerging award celebrates a new initiative that has shown potential for long-term impact, achievement and scholarship. The BSHARP program is a community engagement effort launched in 2015 that provides dyads (persons with dementia {PWD} and their caregivers), tickets to attend five Fort Collins Symphony Masterworks concerts and social hours. The study explores factors such as the impact of the program on cognition in PWD, relationships with caregivers, and the degree to which participants feel supported by the community. Our collaboration has led to emphasizing facets of the concerts that participants endorse having the greatest impact (the appreciation of the Maestro’s recognition at the concerts) and understanding the course of change in the participants.

●Jerome Krase, Brooklyn College CUNY co-led with Małgorzata Bogunia-Borowska and Anna Sarzyńska a Graduate Visual Sociology Workshop, “Seeing Krakow Change: 1997-2018,” at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland (May 7-10). Subsequently, during his Fulbright Specialist Scholarship Assignment in Prague, at the Charles University (May 11-25) he was honored to give the Ernest Gellner Nationalism Seminar, Sponsored by the Czech Association for Social Anthropology and the Czech Sociological Society, in Cooperation with the Institute of Sociological Studies of the Faculty of Social Sciences, Charles University. With his daughter Kathryn Krase he published “Undermining Governmental Legitimacy at the Grass Roots: The Role of Failed Promises and Inflated Expectations of Community Accountability,” In Legitimacy: Ethnographic and Theoretical Insights, edited by Italo Pardo and Giuliana B. Prato, Palgrave-Macmillan, 2019: 169-92. When he returned in the Fall, he was elected Vice-President, City University of New York’s Academy of Humanities and Sciences.

●Meghan M. O’Neil is Social Science Research Fellow with University of Michigan Law School, Postdoctoral Fellow Affiliate with Population Studies Center at the Institute for Social Research, and Faculty Expert at Poverty Solutions. O’Neil is co-investigator on over $2.7 million in grants to conduct empirical legal research to increase access to justice for vulnerable Americans and better understand the economic barriers facing people who interact with the criminal justice system. She is the lead investigator for the State of Michigan on a mixed methods multi-state study of fines and fees assessed for parolees on Community Corrections Fines and Fees sponsored by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. O’Neil led a team of students and won two INNOVATE awards in a public service pitch campaign for her study, Removing Barriers to Recovery: Community Partnering for Innovative Solutions to the Opioid Crisis while completing her dissertation earlier this year. O’Neil has obtained support from seven courts, two treatment centers, and a tech-startup to provide no cost legal tools to 10,000 community members seeking recovery from addiction services over the next year. Echoing Desmond and Western (2018), she acknowledges that poverty is multidimensional and is a matter of “justice,” not merely economics. Her scholarship relies upon empirical evidence to improve our understanding of American poverty and help identify paths to overcome the challenges of achieving intergenerational mobility, especially for minority families. Her recent work is forthcoming in Law and Contemporary Problems and a special issue of Phylon sponsored by the Russell Sage Foundation in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. and WEB Du Bois.

●Diane M. Sicotte (P.I.), Associate Professor of Sociology, Drexel University, and Kelly A. Joyce (co-P.I.), Professor of Sociology and the Center for Science, Technology and Society, Drexel University, were awarded $345,270 from NSF through the Science, Technology, and Society program for a three-year project, titled “Societal Aspects of Energy Infrastructure Expansion.”Through interviews, fieldwork and content analysis, the research team will examine the opinions of labor union leaders and members on efforts to develop and expand gas infrastructure versus renewable energy sources. The technical and scientific expertise of unionized workers will be studied in order to understand how, and if, such expertise impacts technology design and use, or is used in political claims-making and policy formation.

●Michael Timberlake, former CUSS secretary/treasurer and past North American editor of Urban Studies, retired at the end of June from the University of Utah.  Though retired, he is still working on three projects: Chinese cities in the world system of cities (collaborative with John Stevens and Xiulian Ma); urban transformation in Seoul in global perspective (with K. Shin), and race and the persistent under-development of the lower Mississippi Delta.  Now living in Seattle, he would enjoy meeting other social scientists doing related work living in the area and hearing about their research.  Mike can still be reached at timber@soc.utah.edu

Editor’s Note (Winter 2019)


William Holt
Birmingham-Southern College
CUSS Newsletter, 2019 Winter, Vol 32, No 1

The CUSS Newsletter starts its 32nd year, with

Three new assistant editors: Elizabeth Korver-Glenn, assistant professor at the University of New Mexico; Kyle Galindez, a graduate student at the University of California, Santa Cruz; and Steven Schmidt, a graduate student at the University of California, Irvine. They will be developing new features and articles for the CUSS Newsletter for the 2018-19 editions. 

Check out Kyle and Steven’s interviews with the 2018 ASA CUSS Award recipients on pages 12-17 as well as a Q & A session with Deidre Oakley, the new editor of City & Community, on page 4.

Following a suggestion by Lily Hoffman when she served as chair, the CUSS Newsletter’s first edition each year always includes a feature on the Lynd Lifetime Achievement Award recipient. Please look at page 1 to read Nancy Denton’s reflection as the 2018 recipient.

Please see the 2019 CUSS Awards Call for Nominations. Contact information is on page 7 for each award which all have a common April 2, 2019 deadline.

On page 10 you will find Jerry Krase’s scenes from his team taught Graduate Visual Sociology Workshop with his visual studies students at Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland.

This edition includes regular sections such as   New Books, New Publications, and New Dissertations. Look in the News & Notes section for news from other CUSS Members. The Announcements include calls for two conferences as well as the 2019 CUSS ASA Pre-conference on page 22.

As always, please contact me at wholt@bsc.edu with ideas for editions.

Q&A with City & Community editor, Deirdre Oakley

New CUSS Newsletter Assistant Editor, Kyle Galindez, University  of California, Santa Cruz, interviewed Deirdre Oakley about her new role as City & Community editor.

What motivated you to pursue the C&C editorship?

Not many people know this, but I started my career in magazine publishing right out of college – moving to New York City from Brunswick, Maine.  I worked for Vanity Fair and Fortune before I went to graduate school. While academic peer-review journals clearly have different audiences and expectations, as well as typically non-glossy and four-color (except for Contexts), I’ve always been interested in eventually becoming an editor in the academic world.

City & Community is also near and dear to my heart because the journal was launched while I was in graduate school and the first article coming from my dissertation was published in C&C. I have been a loyal reader and reviewer since its inception. When the call went out for a new editor in 2017 I thought about applying, was on the fence for a while because it’s an enormous responsibility to take on, and I was in the middle of writing a NSF grant (ultimately not funded). I finally decided that it’s now or never. My rationale: I’m a full professor so I don’t have to worry about promotion (because trust me, being editor has slowed down my productivity significantly); it would be a great opportunity for some of my grad and undergraduate students; and an opportunity to make a different kind of contribution to my field.  In short, my inner-self concluded I should go for it (and so did my husband).

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Chair’s Message (Winter 2019)

Rachel Dwyer
Ohio State State University
CUSS Newsletter, 2019 Winter, Vol 32, No 1

Autumn 2018 has brought sobering reminders of the power of community, for good, but also for terror, for bringing people together, but also for erecting walls. In the worst cases, communities of hate encourage the vile impulses of oppressing and excluding any defined as “other”, even to the point of mass violence. Communities of hate all too often get goaded on and strengthened by powerful and cynical interests in the service of their own pedestrian wills toward greed and power. At the same time, our highest hopes of social inclusion and human flourishing arise out of strong and diverse communities that foster openness, connection, learning, and tolerance.

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Chair’s Message

Miriam Greenberg
UC Santa Cruz
CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2018, Vol 30, No 3

I am excited to see many of you in Philadelphia at our upcoming CUSS panels, business meeting, reception and related sessions and events.  Given the fraught state of our nation, its cities and communities, I find myself thinking more and more that the work we in CUSS do —as researchers and writers, teachers and mentors, citizens of academic departments and sections, and publicly engaged scholars— has never been more vital.  Core CUSS concerns intersect with and illuminate so many of the most contested issues of the day: immigration and citizenship, race and socio-spatial inequality, culture and representation, urbanization and the environment, social movements and the right to city.  Through our conversations about this work at our panels, gatherings, and mentorship meetings, we elevate modes of discourse—critical inquiry, collective support, and engaging across difference—that seem increasingly anathema to those in power, here and around the world.  And where better than the City of Brotherly Love to come together and have these conversations; collectively interrogate our current conjuncture, its history and possible futures; and celebrate and enliven the work and vision of our section?

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Editor’s Note

William Holt
Birmingham-Southern College
CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2018, Vol 30, No 3

This year’s ASA Annual Conference will be held in Philadelphia from August 11-14. The CUSS Newsletter Summer 2018 edition features two articles on the host city. Michael Scott and David Marshall’s article examines issues around school choice and urban transit. Prentiss Dantzler , who grew up in Philadelphia, provides a personal narrative and reflection on his hometown.
This newsletter edition includes regular features including News & Notes, Announcements, New Books, and New Publications.

Also, the CUSS Publications Committee is developing new ways to get members involved in the section. One opportunity is the new assistant editor positions for the CUSS Newsletter. Please contact me if you have any questions about the application and responsibilities. Additionally, CUSS is revamping its web and social media presence. If interested in getting involved contact Albert Fu, Kutztown State, who is leading this effort.

News & Notes

CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2018, Vol 30, No 3

William Holt, Birmingham-Southern College, received the Henry C. Randall Award for his work establishing the campus chapter of Kapa Alpha Omicron  environmental honor society. Also, Holt serves as the advisor to the  men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams. Both teams are perennially ranked in  the NCAA Division Three ’s Top 20  as well as Southern Athletic Association champions.

Juan Martinez, Harold Washington College, has accepted a tenure-track assistant professor position in the Department of Sociology at Northeastern Illinois University.

Gregory D. Squires, George Washington University, received the 2018 Contribution to the Field of Urban Affairs Award given by the Urban Affairs Association. In announcing the award the UAA observed that “The committee chose Squires based on the influence of his prodigious scholarship examining urban housing markets, and for the breadth of his engagement with the UAA and other national organizations that advance our field. Squires is a prolific scholar who has published 17 books as author or editor, along with 100 journal articles and book chapters. His work is frequently reprinted in collections, offering evidence of his influence on colleagues who assemble such collections. Well beyond scholarly circles, Squires has helped to shape public policy debates about discriminatory lending, redlining, and the near-collapse of the mortgage market in 2008. As an expert witness, a legal consultant, and a working member of commissions and councils, he has called attention to unequal and discriminatory practices and identified policies that advance social justice.”

Stacy Torres, SUNY Albany, has accepted a position as an assistant professor of sociology in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, to begin this fall.

 

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