Tag Archives: CFP

What to Expect at City & Community

Richard E. Ocejo
John Jay College and the Graduate Center, CUNY
2021 Winter, Vol. 34, No.1 

It is an absolute honor to be the next Editor-in-Chief at City & Community. The journal began publication around when I started graduate school, so there hasn’t been a time when I haven’t known of its existence. Whether from reading its pages, contributing as an author, or assigning its pieces in my courses, it has played an indispensable role in my career. And now getting to run City & Community at this stage in its history, build on the efforts of so many great Editors and scholars, and take it to another level is a dream come true.

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CFP: Urban Processes Under Racial Capitalism

Urban Processes Under Racial Capitalism

Special Issue

City & Community

Guest Editors:

  • Prentiss A. Dantzler, Georgia State University
  • Junia Howell, University of Pittsburgh
  • Elizabeth Korver-Glenn, University of New Mexico

For over a century, urban sociologists have attempted to disentangle the role race and class play in shaping city spaces and urban lives. However, Black scholars have challenged this dichotomy, arguing race and class are mutually constituted forms of exploitation. In his pioneering book, Black Marxism, the late historian Cedric J. Robinson argues racism was fundamental to the feudal order of early capitalism and has remained foundational in all constructions of class. Seminal works like W.E.B. Du Bois’ (1935) Black Reconstruction and more recent books like Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor’s (2019) Race for Profit echo Robinson’s approach arguing economic value is derived from the racialization of labor and property. Yet, urban sociology has not fully explored how racial capitalism changes and reshapes our core theoretical approaches.

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2021 ASA Annual Meeting: Community and Urban Sociology Section (CUSS) Sessions

Submit your paper for the 2021 ASA Annual Meeting!

Racial Equity, Repair, and the Global Movement for Black Lives

Session Organizer/Chair: Monica Bell, Yale University

In the seven years since George Zimmerman’s acquittal in the murder of Trayvon Martin, activists and organizers have taken to the streets to build a global movement for Black lives, making demands of their cities and communities to dismantle racism in the criminal legal system and invest in structures that support Black futures. Most recently, the uprisings of 2020 have unfolded amidst the health inequities magnified by COVID-19, highlighted racialized police violence, and a global concern over anti-blackness. This session seeks paper submissions that broadly attend to the linkages between this global movement for Black lives and the ways it has been situated and experienced locally in cities, suburbs, and rural communities. Papers in this session may address questions about the range of demands that activists are making (from prison and police reform to abolition); the range of tactics used within the social movements; the influence of contemporary queer and intersectional organizing; coalition building with Latinx, indigenous, and immigrant social movements; and the continuously changing and colliding notions of the city’s racial landscapes in relationship to protest and racial discourse. 

Pandemic and the Modern Metropolis

Session Organizer/Chair: Neil Brenner, University of Chicago

The COVID19 pandemic has changed the structure and organization of urban life, globally. As cities grappled with whether and how to enforce new safety measures, from physical distancing to quarantine, urban sociologists have been attentive to questions about how social life is changing, and with what consequences. What unique impact has COVID19 had on urban places? And will urban life ever be the same? Papers in this session will answer questions about how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted social life and inequality in the city: from issues related to density and population; to housing and the looming eviction crisis; surveillance and social unrest; the use or misuse of public space; food and work (in)security, mobilities, and vulnerabilities; and the newly emerging (or disappearing) formations of urban community and social life.  

Community, Policy and the Politicization of Space 

Session Organizer/Chair: Claudia Lopez, California State University – Long Beach

In the summer of 2020, President Trump announced that he would send a “surge” of federal law enforcement officers to U.S. cities that he deemed to be riddled with disorder and lawlessness. He warned that nearby suburban enclaves could become overrun with crime if they supported the inclusion of, for example, low-income housing. These comments highlight ongoing questions about landscape hierarchies and spatial inequality as zoning and land-use regulations that continue to fuel racial/ethnic and economic disparities across multiple global contexts and scales. This session welcomes papers that investigate issues related to rural-urban-suburban divides; global migration, political segregation; and spatial conflict across regions.

A Critical Lens on Urban Sociology

Session Organizer/Chair: Orly Clerge, University of California, Davis

This session invites papers that broadly theorize about the origins and expansions of urban sociology as a discipline, and questions about who has benefited or lost. Papers may theorize or answer the following: What would decoloniality mean as an approach to urban sociology? How has urban sociology, as a tool, served the interests of white supremacy, patriarchy, empire, or capitalism? What is the composition of urban sociology’s “workforce,” and who earns credit and prestige? How can urban sociologists rethink curriculum, canon, epistemology, and method? What other origin stories in urban sociology remain concealed or obscured? What urban sociological approaches or schools of thought have caused harm for the communities they study? And within the field of urban sociology, what could it look like to redistribute resources or repair harm?  

Essays on The Sociology of Housing

CALL FOR PAPERS

Please find attached a call for papers on the Sociology of Housing.

In this edited volume, we seek to take stock of the current field of scholarship and provide new directions for the sociological study of housing. The collection of essays aims to both organize current research, highlight important aspects of the subfield, and provide a roadmap for sociological studies of housing. We expect authors to draw on diverse methodological approaches, present unique field sites and data sources, and foreground sociological theory to understanding contemporary housing issues. Chapter by chapter, we anticipate that the volume will generate promising directions for the sociological analysis of housing.

Proposals are due on March 13th. Additional submission details are in the attached flyer.

NEW APPROACHES TO RACE AND ETHNICITY IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES: A JUNIOR SCHOLAR SYMPOSIUM

Department of Sociology, Boston University

April 17, 2020

The Department of Sociology at Boston University invites research presentations on the topic of race and ethnicity in global perspectives. Presentations will be part of a day-long junior scholar symposium showcasing the work of doctoral candidates, postdoctoral fellows, or assistant professors from historically underrepresented groups in the academy.

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4th University of Chicago Ethnography Incubator

CALL FOR GRADUATE STUDENT SUBMISSIONS

We are pleased to announce the 4th annual meeting of the University of Chicago Ethnography Incubator. Each year, the Incubator invites four faculty fellows and six graduate student fellows to the University of Chicago to participate in a two-day panel and workshop series. The Incubator is designed to advance ethnographic methodologies, provide hands-on mentorship to graduate student fellows, and build an interdisciplinary community of ethnographers. We invite applications from graduate students in any discipline who are engaged in dissertation-level, ethnographic research. 

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