Tag Archives: awards

2019 CUSS Awards

Robert and Helen Lynd Award for Distinguished Career Achievement

Anne B. Shlay, Georgia State University

Robert E. Park Book Award co-winners

Marcus Anthony Hunter and Zandria F. Robinson. 2018. Chocolate Cities: The Black Map of American Life. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

and

Esther Sullivan. 2018. Manufactured Insecurity: Mobile Home Parks and Americans’ Tenuous Right to Place. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

Jane Addams Article Award

Papachristos, Andrew and Sara Bastomski. 2018. “Connected in Crime: The Enduring Effect of Neighborhood Networks on the Spatial Patterning of Violence.” American Journal of Sociology 124:517-568.

CUSS Graduate Student Paper Award

Winner: Zachary Hyde, University of British Columbia. 2018. “Giving Back to Get Ahead: Altruism as a Developer Strategy of Accumulation Through Affordable Housing Policy in Toronto and Vancouver,” Geoforum (online ahead of print)

Honorable mention: Christine Jang-Trettien, Johns Hopkins University, “Social Structure of the Informal Housing Market”

The awards will be presented at the CUSS Business Meeting and Award Ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 10 @ 3:30-4:10pm in the Empire Ballroom East on the Second Floor of the Sheraton New York (though double check final program to verify location). Please join us to celebrate!

2018 Lynd Award Recipient: Career Reflections

Nancy Denton
SUNY Albany
CUSS Newsletter, 2019 Winter, Vol 32, No 1

At the end of my first year of retirement from the University at Albany, I was thrilled to receive the Robert and Helen Lynd Lifetime Achievement Award from the Community and Urban Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association. As I examined the list of others who had won it, I was humbled and extremely grateful to my nominator and to the committee who chose me. Winning this award, along with retirement, has given me the perfect opportunity to reflect on my career as an urban sociologist. And as I’m sure others would agree, urban sociology is a particularly rewarding field as you are able to investigate “real” problems that affect “real” people. (Of course my demographic training led me to do this from a data perspective, not one of actual on-the-ground engagement in the urban landscape. But be that as it may.)

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