Tag Archives: City & Community

City & Community News – Moving to SAGE

  1. City & Community is in the final stages for its transition from Wiley to Sage. To submit a manuscript (including revisions) paste https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cico DIRECTLY into your proser. If you go to the Wiley submission page, you won’t find a portal for City & Community. Manuscript are now going out for review. Those that were in the queue from the pause on reviewing have all been sent out. We are in the process of creating a CUNY email address for C&C, which should go live in the next several months. If you have questions you can email us directly (doakley1@gsu.edu or rocejo@jjay.cuny.edu) or use the GSU email (cico@gsu.edu).
  2. Our September 2020 issue is live! https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/15406040/2020/19/3
    • The issue’s symposium: “Eyes of a Storm: COVID-19, Systemic Racism, and Police Brutality” is free access for the next month and features essays by Phil Kasinitz, Alyasah Ali Sewell, Katie Acosta, Jean Beaman, Bruce Haynes, Tyler Gay, Sam Hammer and Erin Ruel. We also have a feature article; “ ‘Not Just a Lateral Move’: Residential Decisions and the Reproduction of Urban Inequality by Stefanie DeLuca and Christine Jang-Trettien.
  3. The December 2020 issue will be the last issue published with Wiley and we are excited about the journal moving to Sage.

New City & Community Editor

Dear CUSS Membership,

I’m writing to deliver an important announcement.

I’m pleased to announce that our section’s journal, City & Community (C&C), has a new editor-in-chief: Richard E. Ocejo. Richard’s vision is to build upon the journal’s strong foundation and broaden its influence within the discipline of sociology and the field of urban studies. In the coming years, C&C readers and authors can expect a lot of continuity from Deirdre Oakley’s outstanding editorship (e.g., an increasingly international focus, quick turnaround on reviews, and publication timeline) as well as some new initiatives. Among Richard’s plans are a revamped, active, and inclusive editorial board, additional website content (like podcast interviews), and a professional development program for young scholars. I’m very excited to see how he advances our journal over the next few years.

I want to thank Richard for taking on this critical CUSS role as well as acknowledge Kirsta Paulsen (chair, CUSS Publications Committee), Japonica Brown-Saracino (past CUSS chair), and the Publications Committee and Council members for their great work in helping to select our new C&C editor. I also want to sincerely thank Deirdre Oakley for her incredible effort as C&C’s editor for the last three years.

As the fall semester gets underway, I hope you manage to remain productive and energized during these difficult times. Our collective work on urban dynamics, race, and social justice is so important right now and I urge you to stay engaged with the academy, CUSS, and your community.

Best,

Derek Hyra

Section Chair

City & Community (March 2020)

The new issue is out!

https://www.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/15406040/2020/19/1

Includes:

  1. Symposium on the importance of small cities edited by Richard Ocejo and Ervin Kosta
  2. Two articles on gentrification by Cameron Hightower & Jim Fraser, and by Brendon Beck.
  3. Book reviews:
    • Review by Bruce Haynes on former C&C editor Lance Freeman’s new book on The (Archetypal) Ghetto in Black America
    • Review by Joan Maya Mazelis on Esther Young’s new book about Manufactured Insecurity of mobile homes.

New Editor for City & Community

Individual and team applications are invited for the position of editor of City & Community, the journal of the American Sociological Association’s Community and Urban Sociology Section (CUSS)The official term for the new editor (or co-editors) will begin in January 2021. The editorial transition will begin in late 2020 with the first issue of the new editorial team being the March 2021 issue. The editor’s term is for a minimum of three years, until December 2023, with a possible reappointment of up to an additional two years.

Read more

NEW COVER: City & Community

Kyle Galindez
University of California, Santa Cruz

Steven Schmidt
University of California, Irvine

Interview with Deirdre Oakley, Editor-in-Chief, City & Community

CUSS Newsletter, 2019 Spring, Vol. 32, No 2

-City & Community recently debuted a new cover for the March 2019 volume. What motivated the redesign?

When I became editor in 2018, the original cover design was 16 years old and I thought it was time for a new look. I also found out that Wiley, our publisher, would work with me and my on-site editorial staff on a new design free-of-charge. At the time, the Section’s Chair (Miriam Greenberg) and Publication Committee’s co-chairs (Heather MacIndoe and Japonica Brown-Saracino were supportive of the idea), as was ASA.

-Can you tell me about your editorial vision for the new cover?

There is a form of cityscape art called original line/pencil illustration or rendering. I was familiar with British Illustrator Abi Daker’s work (http://www.abigaildaker.com) and found it inspiring. This is because, symbolically, the contributions to City & Community ‘draw’ cities and the communities within them (both past and present) to reveal unique visions of previously uncovered productions.

One of the urban themes I learned when I was pursuing my master’s degree in geography in the early 1990s was that of the city as a palimpsest. This historic word originally referred to the reuse of parchment for the written word during the 1500s. Basically, with parchment, the previous text — while erased – bled through the new text. We could liken this practice today to what happens with graffiti. But back to history, the term palimpsest began to be used more broadly in the realm of urbanism to illustrate the multiple layers of the city, whether it’s about changes over time, the way different groups perceive their city, placemaking and de-placemaking, infrastructure, inequality (ethnic, racial or socioeconomic), as well as how such aspects of the urban environs are imagined. While it’s virtually impossible to convey the city palimpsest surface in a static cover design, that’s the foundational idea behind our new cover: a rendering of some generic city in line/pencil illustration form, which fades into the distance representing the present, past and future. Fortunately, we had the option for two colors to distinguish the journal title from the artwork.

The Wiley design team is confined to working with stock art (no this is not Daker’s work!), so it took some back and forth to get the image in line with what I wanted it to convey. They did a great job, for which we are all very appreciative. I am also grateful for the quick turn-around time for cover redesign approval by our Section leadership as well as the ASA.

On behalf of the entire on-site GSU Editorial Team, I’ll just say we hope you all like our new cover!

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