Tag Archives: Newsletter

Editor’s Note

William Holt
Birmingham-Southern College
CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2018, Vol 30, No 3

This year’s ASA Annual Conference will be held in Philadelphia from August 11-14. The CUSS Newsletter Summer 2018 edition features two articles on the host city. Michael Scott and David Marshall’s article examines issues around school choice and urban transit. Prentiss Dantzler , who grew up in Philadelphia, provides a personal narrative and reflection on his hometown.
This newsletter edition includes regular features including News & Notes, Announcements, New Books, and New Publications.

Also, the CUSS Publications Committee is developing new ways to get members involved in the section. One opportunity is the new assistant editor positions for the CUSS Newsletter. Please contact me if you have any questions about the application and responsibilities. Additionally, CUSS is revamping its web and social media presence. If interested in getting involved contact Albert Fu, Kutztown State, who is leading this effort.

News & Notes

CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2018, Vol 30, No 3

William Holt, Birmingham-Southern College, received the Henry C. Randall Award for his work establishing the campus chapter of Kapa Alpha Omicron  environmental honor society. Also, Holt serves as the advisor to the  men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams. Both teams are perennially ranked in  the NCAA Division Three ’s Top 20  as well as Southern Athletic Association champions.

Juan Martinez, Harold Washington College, has accepted a tenure-track assistant professor position in the Department of Sociology at Northeastern Illinois University.

Gregory D. Squires, George Washington University, received the 2018 Contribution to the Field of Urban Affairs Award given by the Urban Affairs Association. In announcing the award the UAA observed that “The committee chose Squires based on the influence of his prodigious scholarship examining urban housing markets, and for the breadth of his engagement with the UAA and other national organizations that advance our field. Squires is a prolific scholar who has published 17 books as author or editor, along with 100 journal articles and book chapters. His work is frequently reprinted in collections, offering evidence of his influence on colleagues who assemble such collections. Well beyond scholarly circles, Squires has helped to shape public policy debates about discriminatory lending, redlining, and the near-collapse of the mortgage market in 2008. As an expert witness, a legal consultant, and a working member of commissions and councils, he has called attention to unequal and discriminatory practices and identified policies that advance social justice.”

Stacy Torres, SUNY Albany, has accepted a position as an assistant professor of sociology in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, to begin this fall.

 

ASA Conference Feature: Sweet Home

Source https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Philadelphia_cityscape_BW_20150328.jpg

Prentiss A. Dantzler
Colorado College
CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2018, Vol 30, No 3

Last time ASA was held in Philadelphia was 2005, the same year I graduated high school. A staple in urban sociology, Philly has undergone many significant changes since then. Being raised in West Philly, my younger years were quite different than that of the Fresh Prince. My childhood functioned somewhat between W.E.B. DuBois’ (1899) Philadelphia Negro and William Julius Wilson’s (1987) The Truly Disadvantaged. In a state of double consciousness, I constantly wondered (at least on a surface) why my neighborhood was the way it was. Countless other works within our field have helped me make sense of different aspects of my childhood. Why was my family adamant about sending me to Catholic school (even though they were not at all Catholic)? Why did I have to take 3 forms of transportation to get to high school while my peers drove in new cars and trucks? What happen to all of the public housing that stood tall in many of the Black neighborhoods? How did I make it out and why are others still in the same place? And better yet, why does “making it out” mean living in white spaces? As a late comer to sociology, the joys and perils of understanding these dynamics within community and urban sociology have largely shaped my reflection on the city of Brotherly Love – a place I still call home.

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Exploring Spatial Equity in Philadelphia through Public Transit and School Choice

Michael R. Scott
University of Texas, Austin

David T. Marshall
Auburn University

CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2018, Vol 30, No 3

As we prepare for spending a few days in Philadelphia at ASA this year, we wanted to share a bit of our research. David has lived and worked in Philadelphia for a few years, and Mike is from not far away and visits often. That said, it’s made for personally compelling research. Given that we are education researchers, our research specifically is on schools. Therefore, we hope this article gives a preview of Philadelphia through our research on the public schools and the public transportation system.

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Announcements

 CULTURAL PLURALISM IN CITIES OF THE GLOBAL SOUTH
European University Institute, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies,

Florence, Italy
20-22 March 2019

Over the last thirty years, a notable strand of research has focused on global cities: late-modern versions of city-states that construct global profiles, often bypassing any sense of nationhood, and which are characterized by the contemporaneous presence of local/global elites and a low-paid (and often migrant) service class that is indispensable for the city to function. But major centres of socioeconomic and cultural power are clearly emerging outside the West in our current multi-polar and highly dynamic geopolitical and cultural landscape. New scholarship calls into question the “global cities” model and calls our attention to how cities in Asia and Africa are constructing their own relation to the world. This new scholarship emphasises the role of culture, religion, and knowledge circulation rather than focusing primarily on economic and financial life as did earlier approaches.

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2017 Lynd Award: Neighborhood & the City

Robert Sampson

Robert J Sampson
Harvard University
CUSS Newsletter, Spring 2017, Vol. 30, No 2.

Community and urban sociologists have long addressed questions of fundamental concern to the discipline. This centrality continues. Whether racial segregation, the suburbanization of poverty, durable neighborhood inequality, gentrification, the great crime decline, or the globalizaion of cities, the research of CUSS members probes questions relevant to the discipline at large and the general public. I am thus grateful to be honored with the Lynd Award for lifetime achievement and be part of a community of scholars committed to the rigorous study of communities, both past and present.

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Montreal as a Gateway-City: Value chains and municipal democracy

Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:CentrevilleMontreal%C3%A9t%C3%A9.jpg

Dorval Brunelle
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)
CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2017, Vol. 29, No 3.

This contribution should be read as a historical and sociological introduction to the city of Montreal for our American and Canadian guests attending the 112th ASA meeting here in August. But at the same time, the background here provided will be used to contextualize a research project comparing Montreal with three other Canadian cities (Halifax, Toronto and Vancouver) on their respective policies, programs and actions as gateway-cities. Among the questions raised, we want to know what is the role of the municipal government in this regard, the content of its policies and programs, which stakeholders are involved, and how these policies, programs and actions make their way through the filters of municipal democracy. Although a comparative study, only the Montreal segment will be presented.

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Rural Voters and the Rural Vote in 2016

David L. Brown
Cornell University

Shannon Monnat
Penn State University1
CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2018, Vol 30, No 3.

Much has been written about the impact of rural voters, and the rural vote, on the 2016 presidential election. According to The Pew Research Center, Trump beat Clinton in rural areas by 62% to 34%, and by 50% to 45% in the suburbs. In contrast, Clinton bested Trump by 59% to 35% in urban areas. Moreover, Trump’s share of votes grew in direct relation with the degree of urbanization from about 40% in metropolitan areas with 1 million or more people to 58% in smaller metropolitan areas to fully 70% in totally rural counties (Kurtzleben 2016). Research shows that the share of rural votes cast for Democratic presidential candidates since 2000 was highest in 2008, and declined in both 2012 and especially in 2016. Moreover, this pattern characterizes nonmetropolitan counties with and without small and medium sized cities, and to a lesser degree both core and suburban parts of smaller metropolitan areas (See Figure 12). Only large metropolitan core areas avoided the Democratic drop off (Scala and Johnson 2017f).

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Conference Feature: Urban Cascadia

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seattle_4.jpg

Ryan Centner
London School of Economics
CUSS Newsletter. Summer 2016. Vol 28. No. 3

For those of you attending the Seattle annual meetings: Welcome to the northwestern edge of the Americas – “Cascadia” – a region I am proud to call home, even though I currently live some 5,000 miles away in an increasingly provincial archipelago known as the British Isles. If this is your first encounter with the Pacific Northwest, you may be scratching your head. What is Cascadia? And how can someone so far away still consider it “home”? I aim to answer these questions while briefly conveying some of the distinctive features that define the three largest Northwestern cities of Vancouver, Seattle, and Portland (see map in Figure 1), including innovations and inequalities. Cascadia, to begin, is a somewhat contested term (Helm 1993; Smith 2008; Abbott 2009). As a regional moniker, clearly it references the Cascade Range of mountains that run from northern California up to southern British Columbia. Its vernacular origins derive from popular depictions of the Pacific Northwest as a kind of “ecotopia” (Callenbach 1975; Garreau 1981), reflecting both a unique landscape and unusual society-environment rela-tionship. Seattle-based sociologist David McCloskey (1988: n.p.) developed the notion of a cross-border bioregion, noting that:

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Conference Feature: Where is the Chicago Ghetto?

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chicago_north_from_John_Hancock_2004-11_img_2618.jpg

Ray Hutchison
University of Wisconsin­-Green Bay
CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2015, Vol. 27, No. 3

Ernest Burgess’s essay, “The Growth of the  City” presents us with one of the iconic images  in urban sociology and  beyond; the concentric zone model has been  reprinted in virtually every  textbook in urban geography, urban sociology, and  more. Burgess is clear  that the purpose of the  model (or chart, as he  labeled it) is to demonstrate the process of  neighborhood succession, a central concept for  the Chicago School: “In the expansion of the  city a process of distribution takes place which  sifts and sorts and relocates individuals and  groups by residence and  occupation. The resulting  differentiation of the cosmopolitan American city into areas is typically all  from one pattern, with  only interesting minor  modifications. Within the  central business district  or on an adjoining street  is the “main stem” of  “hobohemia,” the teeming  Rialto of the homeless  migratory man of the Middle West. In the zone of  deterioration encircling  the central business section are always to be  found the so­called  “slums” and “bad lands,”  with their submerged regions of poverty, degradation, and disease, and  their underworlds of  crime and vice. Within a  deteriorating area are  rooming­house districts,  the purgatory of “lost  souls.” Near by is the Latin Quarter, where creative and rebellious spirits  resort. The slums are  also crowded to overflowing with immigrant colonies—the Ghetto, Little  Sicily, Greektown, Chinatown—fascinatingly combining Old World heritages and American adaptations. Wedging out from  here is the Black Belt,  with its free and disorderly life.”

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