City & Community Vol. 17, No. 4

Vol. 17 No. 4 is now out.

Symposium

Community and Crime, Guest Edited by Rachael Woldoff

Community and Crime: Now More than Ever

Broken Windows as Growth Machines: Who Benefits from Urban Disorder and Crime?

Place and Perception: Constructions of Community and Safety across Neighborhoods and Residents

Priming the Pump: Public Investment, Private Mortgage Investment, and Violent Crime

Problems Establishing Identity/Residency in a City Neighborhood during a Black/White Police‐Citizen Encounter: Reprising Du Bois’ Conception of Submission as “Submissive Civility”

Understanding the Crime Gap: Violence and Inequality in an American City

Formal Social Control in Changing Neighborhoods: Racial Implications of Neighborhood Context on Reactive Policing

Effects in Disguise: The Importance of Controlling for Constructs at Multiple Levels in Macro‐Level Immigration and Crime Research

Mixed Land Use: Implications for Violence and Property Crime

Community Crime Prevention in High‐Crime Areas: The Seattle Neighborhood Group Hot Spots Project

Articles

How and Why Haifa Has Become the “Palestinian Cultural Capital” in Israel

When the Marae Moves into the City: Being Māori in Urban Palmerston North

Making Jerusalem “Cooler”: Creative Script, Youth Flight, and Diversity

The Armenians of Glendale: An Ethnoburb in Los Angeles’s San Fernando Valley

UniverCity: The Vicious Cycle of Studentification in a Peripheral City

Book Reviews

International Express: New Yorkers on the 7 Train, by Stéphane Tonnelat and William Kornblum. New York, NY: Columbia University Press, 2017. 312 pp. $35.00, ISBN: 0231181485.

Citizen Outsider: Children of North African Immigrants in France, by Jean Beaman. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2017. ISBN‐10: 0520294262, 152 pp. $35 paperback.

Down The Up Staircase: Three Generations Of A Harlem Family, by Bruce Haynes and Syma Solovitch. New York: Columbia University Press, 2017. ISBN: 0231181027; 200 pp. $29 hardcover.

How Places Make Us: Novel LBQ Identities in Four Small Cities, by Japonica Brown‐Saracino. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2018, 325 pp. $35.00. ISBN 978‐0‐226‐36125‐3 (Paperback).

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