Category Archives: Newsletter

Editor’s Note (Winter 2019)


William Holt
Birmingham-Southern College
CUSS Newsletter, 2019 Winter, Vol 32, No 1

The CUSS Newsletter starts its 32nd year, with

Three new assistant editors: Elizabeth Korver-Glenn, assistant professor at the University of New Mexico; Kyle Galindez, a graduate student at the University of California, Santa Cruz; and Steven Schmidt, a graduate student at the University of California, Irvine. They will be developing new features and articles for the CUSS Newsletter for the 2018-19 editions. 

Check out Kyle and Steven’s interviews with the 2018 ASA CUSS Award recipients on pages 12-17 as well as a Q & A session with Deidre Oakley, the new editor of City & Community, on page 4.

Following a suggestion by Lily Hoffman when she served as chair, the CUSS Newsletter’s first edition each year always includes a feature on the Lynd Lifetime Achievement Award recipient. Please look at page 1 to read Nancy Denton’s reflection as the 2018 recipient.

Please see the 2019 CUSS Awards Call for Nominations. Contact information is on page 7 for each award which all have a common April 2, 2019 deadline.

On page 10 you will find Jerry Krase’s scenes from his team taught Graduate Visual Sociology Workshop with his visual studies students at Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland.

This edition includes regular sections such as   New Books, New Publications, and New Dissertations. Look in the News & Notes section for news from other CUSS Members. The Announcements include calls for two conferences as well as the 2019 CUSS ASA Pre-conference on page 22.

As always, please contact me at wholt@bsc.edu with ideas for editions.

Q&A with City & Community editor, Deirdre Oakley

New CUSS Newsletter Assistant Editor, Kyle Galindez, University  of California, Santa Cruz, interviewed Deirdre Oakley about her new role as City & Community editor.

What motivated you to pursue the C&C editorship?

Not many people know this, but I started my career in magazine publishing right out of college – moving to New York City from Brunswick, Maine.  I worked for Vanity Fair and Fortune before I went to graduate school. While academic peer-review journals clearly have different audiences and expectations, as well as typically non-glossy and four-color (except for Contexts), I’ve always been interested in eventually becoming an editor in the academic world.

City & Community is also near and dear to my heart because the journal was launched while I was in graduate school and the first article coming from my dissertation was published in C&C. I have been a loyal reader and reviewer since its inception. When the call went out for a new editor in 2017 I thought about applying, was on the fence for a while because it’s an enormous responsibility to take on, and I was in the middle of writing a NSF grant (ultimately not funded). I finally decided that it’s now or never. My rationale: I’m a full professor so I don’t have to worry about promotion (because trust me, being editor has slowed down my productivity significantly); it would be a great opportunity for some of my grad and undergraduate students; and an opportunity to make a different kind of contribution to my field.  In short, my inner-self concluded I should go for it (and so did my husband).

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Chair’s Message (Winter 2019)

Rachel Dwyer
Ohio State State University
CUSS Newsletter, 2019 Winter, Vol 32, No 1

Autumn 2018 has brought sobering reminders of the power of community, for good, but also for terror, for bringing people together, but also for erecting walls. In the worst cases, communities of hate encourage the vile impulses of oppressing and excluding any defined as “other”, even to the point of mass violence. Communities of hate all too often get goaded on and strengthened by powerful and cynical interests in the service of their own pedestrian wills toward greed and power. At the same time, our highest hopes of social inclusion and human flourishing arise out of strong and diverse communities that foster openness, connection, learning, and tolerance.

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2018 Lynd Award Recipient: Career Reflections

Nancy Denton
SUNY Albany
CUSS Newsletter, 2019 Winter, Vol 32, No 1

At the end of my first year of retirement from the University at Albany, I was thrilled to receive the Robert and Helen Lynd Lifetime Achievement Award from the Community and Urban Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association. As I examined the list of others who had won it, I was humbled and extremely grateful to my nominator and to the committee who chose me. Winning this award, along with retirement, has given me the perfect opportunity to reflect on my career as an urban sociologist. And as I’m sure others would agree, urban sociology is a particularly rewarding field as you are able to investigate “real” problems that affect “real” people. (Of course my demographic training led me to do this from a data perspective, not one of actual on-the-ground engagement in the urban landscape. But be that as it may.)

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Chair’s Message

Miriam Greenberg
UC Santa Cruz
CUSS Newsletter, Summer 2018, Vol 30, No 3

I am excited to see many of you in Philadelphia at our upcoming CUSS panels, business meeting, reception and related sessions and events.  Given the fraught state of our nation, its cities and communities, I find myself thinking more and more that the work we in CUSS do —as researchers and writers, teachers and mentors, citizens of academic departments and sections, and publicly engaged scholars— has never been more vital.  Core CUSS concerns intersect with and illuminate so many of the most contested issues of the day: immigration and citizenship, race and socio-spatial inequality, culture and representation, urbanization and the environment, social movements and the right to city.  Through our conversations about this work at our panels, gatherings, and mentorship meetings, we elevate modes of discourse—critical inquiry, collective support, and engaging across difference—that seem increasingly anathema to those in power, here and around the world.  And where better than the City of Brotherly Love to come together and have these conversations; collectively interrogate our current conjuncture, its history and possible futures; and celebrate and enliven the work and vision of our section?

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