Category Archives: Newsletter

Interview w/ George Greenidge Publicly Engaged Scholar Award Winner

CUSS Newsletter, Winter 2022, Vol. 35, No. 1

George (Chip) Greenidge, Jr., a Ph.D. Candidate at Georgia State University, was the winner of the 2021 Publicly Engaged Scholar Award. George is a scholar-activist whose commitments span non-profit work, government service, philanthropy, and education. Recently, he was President of the Boston Empowerment Zone, a federally funded HUD initiative aimed at economic investment in U.S. urban neighborhoods, and the Founder and Executive Director of the National Black College Alliance, Inc., a nonprofit focused on providing alumni mentors to college and high school students. Currently, George is also the Founder and Director of the Greatest MINDS, an organization which aims to promote public discourse, citizenship and inclusive democracy. He is also a Visiting Democracy Fellow at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard Kennedy School.  Benny Witkovsky and Andrew Messamore reached out to George to discuss his career. Thanks to George for agreeing to participate in our interview! 

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Interview w/ Stefanie A. DeLuca

CUSS Newsletter, Winter 2022, Vol. 35, No. 1

Stefanie A. DeLuca, James Coleman Professor of Sociology and Social Policy at Johns Hopkins University, is one of 2021’s Publicly Engaged Scholar awardees. Over the course of her career, Stefanie has worked closely with local, state, and federal policymakers to enact meaningful change in the domains of housing accessibility and racial desegregation. Her dedication to publicly-engaged research is reflected in her service to several HUD federal housing commissions in addition to local community and non-profit agencies. More broadly, Stefanie’s scholarship has positively impacted countless households by shaping federal legislation on housing vouchers as well as local housing mobility programs across the country. Thalia Tom reached out to her to discuss her research, and we’re including her responses below. Thanks to Stefanie for participating in our interview series!

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Message From the Communications Team (Summer 2021)

2021 Summer, Vol 34, No 2

This issue of the CUSS Newsletter begins with a piece by team member Steven Schmidt on informal housing    arrangements in Los Angeles. In addition, this issue includes a discussion with 2020 Park Award Winners Scott Frickel and James Elliott on their book Sites Unseen, as well as an interview with Addams award winner Jackelyn Hwang. Also, new City & Community book editors Sofya Aptekar and Ervin Kosta share with us their plans for a more inclusive and global coverage of new books.

As always, newsletter articles are posted on Comurb.org, in addition to being distributed via the listserve. The team also shares links to material via Twitter (@ComUrbASA), and Facebook (CUSS). We are always looking for essays or op-ed pieces that promote community and urban sociology. Pieces can cover new research, teaching and pedagogy, or community activism. Please contact any of us if you are interested.

· Albert Fu <afu@kutztown.edu>

· Leigh-Anna Hidalgo <lhidalgo@binghamton.edu>

· Kyle Galindez <kgalinde@ucsc.edu>

· Lora Phillips <lora.phillips@asu.edu>

· Steven Schmidt <stvnschmidt@gmail.com>

Chair’s Message (Summer 2021)

Derek Hyra
CUSS Newsletter, 2021 Summer, Vol 34, No 2

We are in a much different place than we were earlier this year. Vaccination rates are up, deaths are down, and things are starting to open back up. This has been an extremely difficult year, but I am feeling optimistic and looking forward to the future. We have much collective work to do and lots to celebrate as a section.

In the immediate future, we have an amazing set of section sessions coming up at our ASA Annual Meeting in August. Please virtually join and participate in our four CUSS paper sessions, as we tackle some of the most pressing theoretical and empirical community and urban challenges. Here’s the schedule for our sessions and business meeting.

Don’t miss the CUSS business meeting on Monday, August 9th from 2:30 pm to 3:55 pm (EDT). We will review the state of our section (which is resilient and strong) and celebrate the accomplishments of our members and the broader urban sociology community. Please come to the meeting to help congratulate this year’s set of award winners!

As I noted, our section is strong. As of July 7, we have over 600 members and are standing on solid financial ground as a section going forward. This year we elected a great set of leaders for the various committees and posts and altered our bylaws to reflect our steadfast commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion in all facets of our section. I am proud of our continued work to alleviate and minimize injustices in our society and section.

I wish all of you a great rest of the summer and look forward to seeing many of you in August.

2021 CUSS Awards

1. CUSS Publicly Engaged Scholar Award 2021

Co-winners:

George Greenidge, Georgia State University

Stefanie A. DeLuca, Johns Hopkins University

2. CUSS Graduate Student Paper Award 2021

Ángel Mendiola Ross, University of California, Berkeley, “Outercity Policing: Drivers of Police Spending in a Changing Metropolis.”

3. CUSS Book Award 2021

Marco Garrido, University of Chicago, The Patchwork City: Class, Space, and Politics in Metro Manila (University of Chicago Press 2019)

4. CUSS Jane Addams Article Award 2021

Co-winners:

Bell, Monica C., Yale University, “Located Institutions: Neighborhood Frames, Residential Preferences, and the Case of Policing.” American Journal of Sociology 125, no. 4 (2020): 917-973.

Pacewicz, Josh (Brown University) and Robinson, John (Washington University, St. Louis), “Pocketbook Policing: How Race Shapes Municipal Reliance on Punitive Fines and Fees in the Chicago Suburbs. Socio-Economic Review (2020).

5. CUSS Robert and Helen Lynd Award for Lifetime Achievement 2021

Elijah Anderson, Yale University

Understanding Housing Informality in Los Angeles

by Steven Schmidt, University of California Irvine
CUSS Newsletter, 2021 Summer, Vol 34, No 2

During a warm summer evening in Los Angeles, I interviewed Mabel on the sideline of her son’s baseball practice. A single mom from Guatemala, Mabel lives with her three kids in an apartment bedroom that she rents under the table from an older woman. Mabel sees the rented room as a stepping stone to owning a home: “I want to grow, to eventually have my own house. But for now with my situation, I have to wait a little longer to be able to do it.”[i] Later that year, I met Lisa, a middle-income white woman who rents a home about five minutes away from Mabel. Although her lease does not allow sublets, Lisa usually rents out one of her three bedrooms. I asked what she looks for in a roommate: “We don’t cook animal products, we eat organic, so a health-conscious person. We didn’t want more kids, that was just too much.” Sharing a home is relatively common in Los Angeles, where an estimated 47% of families live doubled-up, or with another adult who is not a romantic partner (Bretz, 2017). While many doubled-up renters live in multigenerational homes, Mabel and Lisa live with non-family members. How do renters find opportunities to rent spaces in other households, and how do families decide who they will allow to live with them?

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Interview w/ Jackelyn Hwang: 2020 Addams Award for Best Article

Jackelyn Hwang, an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Stanford University, was the winner of the 2020 Jane Addams Award for best article. Jackelyn’s innovative research agenda examines the relationship between how neighborhoods change and the persistence of neighborhood inequality by race and class in US cities. We reached out to ask her to discuss her research, and we’re including her responses below. Thanks to Jackelyn for participating in our interview series!

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2020 Park Award: Sites Unseen

The winner of the 2020 Robert E. Park Award is Sites Unseen: Uncovering Hidden Hazards in American Cities.  New York: Russell Sage Foundation by Scott Frickel  & James R. Elliott. It is part of the American Sociological Association’s Rose Series in Sociology. Below is a discussion with the winners on industrial waste and its legacy in the urban landscape.

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